Links for August 6, 2016

Indifference to dissonance in native Amazonians reveals cultural variation in music perception

Despite exhibiting Western-like discrimination abilities and Western-like aesthetic responses to familiar sounds and acoustic roughness, the Tsimane’ rated consonant and dissonant chords and vocal harmonies as equally pleasant. By contrast, Bolivian city- and town-dwellers exhibited significant preferences for consonance, albeit to a lesser degree than US residents. The results indicate that consonance preferences can be absent in cultures sufficiently isolated from Western music, and are thus unlikely to reflect innate biases or exposure to harmonic natural sounds.


The Next Feature Fallacy: The fallacy that the next new feature will suddenly make people use your product

These metrics are terrible, and the Next Feature Fallacy strikes because it’s easy to build new features that don’t target the important parts. Two mistakes are often made when designing features meant to bend this engagement curve:

  • Too few people will use the feature. In particular, that the features target engaged/retained users rather than non-users and new users
  • Too little impact is made when they do engage. Especially the case when important/key functions are displayed like optional actions outside of the onboarding process.

what3words

The world is poorly addressed. This is frustrating and costly in developed nations; and in developing nations this is life-threatening and growth limiting. what3words is a unique combination of just 3 words that identifies a 3mx3m square, anywhere on the planet. It’s far more accurate than a postal address and it’s much easier to remember, use and share than a set of coordinates. Better addressing improves customer experience, delivers business efficiencies, drives growth and helps the social & economic development of countries.